ARKANSAS TRIAL LAWYERS
Personal Attention, Proven Results Since 1953

More on Brain Injury and Prevention of Concussions

Published on Feb 9, 2011 at 10:08 pm in Uncategorized.

Great article in the New Yorker by Ben McGrath. The link, I hope, is posted below. I have also posted a few clips.

“What we now know, from reading Schwarz, is that retired N.F.L. players are five to nineteen times as likely as the general population to have received a dementia-related diagnosis; that the helmet-manufacturing industry is overseen by a volunteer consortium funded largely by helmet manufacturers; and that Lou Gehrig may not actually have had the disease that bears his name but suffered from concussion-related trauma instead. (Since 1960, fourteen N.F.L. players have had a diagnosis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, which is about twelve more than you would expect from a random population sample.) In the manner of Elisabeth Kübler-Ross, Dr. Maroon has delineated four stages in the N.F.L.’s reaction to the reality of brain damage: active resistance and passive resistance, shifting to passive acceptance and, finally, in the past few months, active acceptance. “What we’re seeing now is that major cultural shift, and I think Alan took a lot of barbs, and a lot of hits, initially, for his observations,” Maroon said.”

“Chronic traumatic encephalopathy, or C.T.E., is the name for a condition that is believed to result from major collisions—or from the accumulation of subconcussions that are nowhere near as noticeable, including those incurred in practice. It was first diagnosed, in 2002, in the brain of the Pittsburgh Steelers Hall of Fame center Mike Webster, who died of a heart attack after living out of his truck for a time. It was next diagnosed in one of Webster’s old teammates on the Steelers’ offensive line, Terry Long, who killed himself by drinking antifreeze. Long overlapped, at the end of his career, with Justin Strzelczyk, who was also found to have C.T.E. after he crashed, fatally, into a tanker truck, while driving the wrong way down the New York Thruway.”

Read more https://www.newyorker.com/reporting/2011/01/31/110131fa_fact_mcgrath#ixzz1DV7NKZfj

Free Case Evaluations

Disclaimer: Some non-personal injury related cases do require a consultation fee.
501-502-0985

Call us or fill out the form below to tell us about your potential case and a personal injury lawyer will get back to you as quickly as possible.